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Children & Young People’s Disabilities Team (CYPDT)

Children & Young People’s Disabilities Team (CYPDT)

The Children and Young People’s Disabilities Team assesses and supports children and young people between the ages of 0-25.  The legislation that covers the work of the team is the Children’s Act (1989), the Children and Families Act (2014) and the Care Act (2014).

The team comprises of Social Care workers and Occupational Therapists.

The aim of the CYPDT is to ensure that all disabled children and young people are supported within their families, that they are encouraged to achieve their maximum potential in achieving independence, education, employment and they are fully included and valued members of their local communities.

One of the key roles of the team is to work with young people to prepare them for transition to adulthood and support them through the process. 

Examples of the types of support that might be offered through the CYPDT team could be: help with meeting personal care needs, equipment and or adaptations to properties to help independence.  Carers will also be recognised and offered an assessment and support that may include respite if appropriate.

Personal budgets and direct payments may also be offered to help plan the support required to meet eligible needs.

Who is able to receive a service?

A child under the age of 18 will be eligible for a service from the CYPDT if they have any of the following conditions / impairments

 

  • A diagnosis of severe or profound learning disability

 

  • A diagnosis of severe or profound physical disability

 

  • A diagnosis of Significant or profound sensory disability

 

  • A diagnosis of complex medical needs or a long term condition expected to disable the child for more than one year

 

  • A diagnosis of life threatening illness

 

  • A diagnosis of severe communication disabilities or behavioural difficulties related to the child’s disability (e.g. autism)

 

  • A diagnosis of severe developmental delay

 

  • A diagnosis of a combination of disabilities, which individually are not severe but together cause as much stress as a very severe disability

 

 

  • And that the effects of any of the conditions listed above are likely to impact on the developmental impairment or cause significant harm.

An young person 18 -25 years of age will be eligible for a service if the young person has a physical or learning disability or autism and cannot achieve 2 or more of the following outcomes.

These outcomes are:

  • Managing and maintaining nutrition

1       What to consider

Does the adult have access to food and drink to maintain nutrition and are they able to access, prepare and consume food and drink?

2       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult is eating a restricted or unhealthy diet (e.g. only eats toast):

    • they may have difficulty in getting to the shops to buy food
    • they may be able to prepare food but have swallowing problems.
  • Maintaining personal hygiene

3       What to consider

What is the adult’s ability to wash themselves and launder their clothes?

4       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult cannot reach to wash themselves all over, this is not hygienic.
If the adult does not have access to a washing machine and their mobility is poor, clothes and linen may not be properly clean.

If the adult cannot buy cleaning products, or cognitively understand how to operate a washing machine, their clothes and linen may not be properly clean.

  • Managing toilet needs

5       What to consider

Is the adult able to access and use the toilet and manage their own toilet needs?

6       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the toilet is no longer accessible due to mobility problems or if the adult takes too long to get to the toilet, they may not be managing their toilet needs.

If the adult is unable to maintain their night-time continence, they may not be managing from a dignity-of-life point of view.

  • Being appropriately clothed

7       What to consider

Is the adult able to dress themselves and be appropriately dressed, that is, in relation to the weather or the activities they are undertaking, which could include work/volunteering?

8       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult cannot put on or fasten their clothes, they are unlikely to be appropriately dressed.
If the adult cannot acquire new clothes when needed, they may not be appropriately dressed e.g. for the change in seasons.

The adult may be able to dress themselves in casual clothes unaided but may not be able to dress themselves in more formal work clothes e.g. put on a tie, zip up a dress or clean their shoes, and so would not be appropriately dressed for their circumstances.

If they are severely visually impaired, for example, they may be able to dress themselves but not know if clothes are appropriate or clean.

Note: This may also affect another outcome in relation to accessing work or volunteering.

  • Live in their own home safely and Independently

9       What to consider

Is the adult able to move around the home safely, including climbing steps, using kitchen facilities and accessing the bathroom/toilet?

This includes their immediate environment e.g. access and steps to the home.

10       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult cannot reach certain rooms, they may not be using the home safely or be unreasonably confined e.g. having to spend all day in bed.

If the adult cannot get in or out of the front door (e.g. because they cannot manage the steps), they are unlikely to be using the home safely or have proper access to it.

If the adult is unable to use home appliances properly and safely (e.g. cooker, heater), they may not be meeting this outcome.

  • Maintaining a habitable home environment

11       What to consider

Is the adult’s home sufficiently clean and maintained to be safe, including essential amenities?

Does the adult require support to sustain the home or maintain amenities such as water, electricity and gas or pay their rent or mortgage?

12       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult is unable to pay their rent or utility bills (e.g. due to mental or physical incapacity), they will not be able to sustain their home.

It may not be a habitable home environment if:

    • the home is damp or in very poor repair
    • the adult is unable to clean their kitchen, leading to infestation
    • the adult is hoarding excessively (note: hoarding per se does not determine eligibility; however, the impact of excessive hoarding on the individual’s ability to achieve their outcomes, and thereby on their wellbeing, will affect eligibility).
  • Developing and maintaining family or other personal relationship

13       What to consider

Is the adult lonely or isolated?

Do their needs prevent them from maintaining or developing relationships with family and friends?

14       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

The adult’s physical or psychological state may prevent them from making or maintaining relationships e.g. mental ill-health, autism.

If the adult is unable to communicate easily and regularly – e.g. they may not have, or be able to use, a phone or computer, they may be unable to leave their home safely, they may be unable to communicate successfully or interact with others – this may prevent them from maintaining or developing relationships with family, friends and others.

  • Accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering

15       What to consider

Does the adult have the opportunity and/or wish to apply themselves and contribute to society through work, training, education or volunteering?

This includes physical access to any facility and support with participation in the relevant activity.

16       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult is unable to leave their home safely, or communicate successfully, or interact with others, they may not be able to access work, training, education or volunteering.

If the adult is unable to access information about opportunities available to them, they are unlikely to be able to engage in activities.

  • Making use of necessary facilities or services in the local community, including public transport, and recreational facilities or services

17       What to consider

Is the adult able to get around in the community safely and able to use facilities such as public transport, shops and recreational facilities?

This includes the need for support when attending health care appointments.

18       Examples of circumstances affecting the ability to achieve the outcome

If the adult is unable to walk, or to use public transport unattended or to organise alternative transport (e.g. someone giving them a lift), or does not have money for a taxi, they may not be able to access services locally.

As well as formal appointments e.g. health care appointments, this could include informal appointments e.g. being able to go to the library or to meet a friend in a cafe or pub.

  • Carrying out any caring responsibilities, if the adult has a child.

How do you make a request for a service for children under18?

If you think your child is eligible for support from the CYPDT you should contact the Children's Single Point of Access.   The team will screen and if there are no child protection issues they will send your request to the CYPDT officer who will carry out a further assessment.  Children's Single Point of Access can be contacted on 0118 937 3641.

If your child has been assessed by a CYPDT officer and they have told you that your child is not eligible, you may still be able to access some services directly.  The Reading Services Guide provides information on services and provision available in Reading and can be accessed at www.reading.gov.uk/servicesguide

How do you make a request a service for young adults 18-25?

If you are between 18-25 and you think you are eligible for support from the CYPDT you should call the Contact Centre.   The Contact Centre will firstly screen your call and then will send your request to the CYPDT officer for further assessment.   You can call the Contact Centre on 01189373747.

The assessment that the social care officer will carry out is called a Supported Assessment and Review Document framework (SARD).  

If the young person has been assessed by a CYPDT officer and has told you that the young person is not eligible, you may still be able to access some services directly.  The Reading Services Guide provides information on services and provision available in Reading and can be accessed at www.reading.gov.uk/servicesguide

Who to contact

Telephone
0118 937 3641 - 0-18 years - Children's Single Point of Access
0118 9373747 - 18 - 25 years - Contact Centre
E-mail
[CYPDT@reading.gov.uk, ChildrensSinglePointofAccess@reading.gcsx.gov.uk]
Website
Children's Single Point of Access Referral Form

Other Details

Availability

Age Ranges
0 - 25 years
Referral required
Yes
Referral Details

If you think your child is eligible for support from the CYPDT you should contact the Children's Single Point of Access.   The team will screen and if there are no child protection issues they will send your request to the CYPDT officer who will carry out a further assessment.  Children's Single Point of Access team can be contacted on 0118 937 3641.

Local Offer

This information has been collected from third party providers therefore the Reading Services Guide and Reading Borough Council cannot accept responsibility for the accuracy of this information and recommends that parents, carers, young people, residents and professionals check with providers regarding DBS (Disclosure & Barring Service) and OFSTED registrations and CQC registrations. Information collected by Reading Service Guide; is used solely to implement and supply the Family Information Service (FIS), Special Educational Needs & Disabilities - Reading's Local Offer, Adults & Carers Support Group and Reading Youth.

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